The Importance of Self-Acceptance & 4 Ways to Achieve It

Here are ten everyday habits that have been proven, in study after study, to make people happier. As you read the list, think about how often you practice each one:

  • Giving: doing things for others
  • Relating: connecting with people
  • Exercising: taking care of your body
  • Appreciating: noticing the world around
  • Trying out: continuing to learn new things
  • Direction: having goals to look forward to
  • Resilience: finding ways to bounce back
  • Emotion: taking a positive approach
  • Self-acceptance: being comfortable with who you are
  • Meaning: feeling part of something bigger

A charity called Action for Happiness, in collaboration with another organization, Do Something Different, surveyed 5,000 people to determine how many people practice each of these habits on a regular basis.

Interestingly, in the sample of people surveyed, they found that one of the habits that makes the most powerful contribution to happiness was practiced the least:

Self-Acceptance

Self-acceptance can be described as simply liking yourself. It requires forgiving yourself for your own mistakes and having compassion for yourself. Knowing who you are, your own strengths and weakness, and feeling deeply that, after it’s all added up, you are good enough.

In my 20 years of practicing psychology, two things have always been very clear to me. First, self-acceptance, or self-love, is not only a primary building block for happiness, but it’s also a requirement. And second, the huge majority of people who don’t have self-acceptance lack it for exactly one reason: they don’t know themselves.

And you can’t like and fully accept someone who you do not know.

In my experience, I’ve seen that the majority of people actually would like themselves, if they could actually see the full picture of who they are. But if your self-view is distorted, shallow or missing big pieces, then you are missing not only self-knowledge but also the opportunity for self-acceptance, the foundation for happiness.

Self-knowledge starts in childhood. Lucky children who are raised by parents who truly see them, notice their personalities, their preferences, their emotions, their needs, strengths, and weaknesses, learn who they are through their parents’ reactions to them. When this lucky child looks into his parents’ eyes, he sees his true self reflected there. Because his parent sees him and understands him realistically, he gets a realistic view of himself, and a true understanding of who he is.

Unfortunately, though, the world is full of parents who are too busy, too depressed, too addicted, too self-absorbed, too overwhelmed or too achievement-focused to actually see their children in this very real, truly meaningful way. Many of these parents are none of the above, but they simply are unaware of the emotions of themselves and their children, and end up emotionally neglecting them for that reason. Whatever the cause, these are families of Childhood Emotional Neglect or CEN.

Many emotionally neglectful parents love their children and are good parents in many ways. But because they miss the “feeling” part of parenting, they simply lack the ability to fully see and know their child. Often, they are not able to do so because their own parents did not see or know them either. Typically, it’s no one’s fault, it just is.

Unfortunately, however, no matter the impediment on the part of the parent, the effect upon the child is the same. He grows up not seeing himself, not knowing himself. So how can he truly like himself? And how can he find true happiness?

3 Questions to Ask Yourself

  • Do you feel that you truly know yourself, inside and out?
  • Do you like who you are?
  • Do you love yourself?

If you’re not sure, or if you answered “No” to any of those three questions, it’s okay. Because this is one impediment to your happiness on which you can make great progress yourself.

And the answer is far simpler than you might think.

The 4 Goals to Reach Self-Acceptance

1. Pay attention to yourself.

  • Your likes and dislikes
  • What bothers you?
  • What makes you angry?
  • What is your temperament?
  • What are your values?
  • What are your talents?
  • What are your weaknesses?

2. Identify the things you don’t like about yourself. Are there areas in which you can self-improve? If you can change it to become a better person, set a goal to improve in that area. Self-improvement is likable. And trying is likable, even when you sometimes fail.

3. Have compassion for yourself. You are human, and you have faults and weaknesses, just like every other human being. Learn from every mistake you make, and give yourself credit for trying. Accept that you cannot be perfect.

4. Pay attention to what you feel, and why. Your emotions are the most deeply personal part of who you are. Take responsibility for your feelings. Judge yourself in the big picture, not for one small mistake, weakness or lapse.

Going through life without knowing yourself does plenty of harm to your ability to enjoy life. But since that lack of self-knowledge will chronically hold you back from self-acceptance, and therefore, happiness, it’s triply important to work on the Four Goals above.

After all, you have nothing to lose. And you have self-knowledge, self-love, and happiness to gain.

To learn much more about how Childhood Emotional Neglect happens, how it affects adults and families, and how you can heal, see the books Running On Empty and Running On Empty No More.

Childhood Emotional Neglect is often invisible and unmemorable so it can be hard to know if you grew up with it. To find out Take The Emotional Neglect Test. It’s free!

A version of this article was originally posted on psychcentral.com. It has been republished here with the permission of Psychcentral.

Jonice

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Christina Clayton - December 23, 2019 Reply

Good evening ~
Looking out into our society where so many mothers must be in the work force, children’s emotional requirements are often not fulfilled due to parental absence. Healthy self-love is the beginnings, in childhood, of loving our neighbor, as ourself. As people have not been nurtured and cherished in their unique personhood, our society has grown increasingly sterling at judging one another and comparing self to others, and vice versa. When will we learn the obvious that is so difficult to notice, even of our own children. May God have mercy on us, even when intentions are “good”. Grappling with CEN has been no small matter. However, the beauty for ashes in it all is that the effect of CEN can be resolved and reconciled. In that personal reconciliation and resolve arrives transformation of perspective to gratitude for what is, rather than, what wasn’t. The ravages of family member’s emotional whippings can be given over to its rightful place – – the rear view mirror of life while moving rightfully forward and focused on scenery through the windshield of life. There is always a little haunting to look back into the rear view mirror, but, in acting upon love of self, it will never again be allowed to have authority in our own person.

Karen Gosselin - December 22, 2019 Reply

Thank you for these Email articles. I read your book, Running on Empty, but it is easy to forget some of the information. The articles are timely and keep validating and reinforcing what I continually need to “hear”.

    Jonice - December 29, 2019 Reply

    I’m glad, Karen!

Dr Abdulkadir - December 22, 2019 Reply

It is really enlightening article, thank you Dr.

    Jonice - December 29, 2019 Reply

    I’m so glad you like the article!

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